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ELEMENT 4: REASONING PHASES

With the previous chart, the elements of the Relational Thinking Styles model is complete. However, although the Relational Thinking Styles theoretical model is comprised of action patterns that have particular ways of operating within each of the categories (intensity, duration, and sequence), the "meaning" of these patterns depends upon the consequences they produce upon the conduct of human behavior. These consequences can be both divined historically and predicted for the future when the reasoning pattern is known for an individual and the context for which he has been (or will be) operating is known as well.

This predictive information is gained by means of the Davis Non-verbal Assessment, which determines individual reasoning habits in terms of how an individual addresses each of the three phases of reasoning. The relationship of a specific action pattern to each of the categories may be the same or different during different phases of the reasoning process, depending upon the individual. For example, someone may habitually apply one action pattern for qualifying among options, another for determining priorities, and still another for solving problems. A habitual thinking pattern is comprised of the action patterns applied to the categories at each phase of reasoning. The phases of reasoning are 1) qualifying, 2) prioritizing and 3) producing (or solving problems). The effectiveness (or ineffectiveness) of a particular reasoning habit pattern for a particular phase of reasoning depends upon how closely a person's reasoning habit corresponds to the logical norm for that phase.

Qualifying:
During qualifying phases of a reasoning process, a person makes decisions of value and purpose. These decisions include determinations of relationships having to do with possibility, hypothesis, quality, beauty, ecology, arrangement, intrinsic and extrinsic worth, appropriateness, familiarity, variety, etc. Qualification corresponds to the reasoning phase of hypothesis formation, which (in Peirce's logic) is to be undergone by means of abduction.

Prioritizing:
The prioritizing phases of the reasoning process have to do with the kinds and degrees of planning and/or analysis methods that an individual applies to working out decisions about what to do next. The manner in which an individual engages in this stage of the reasoning process determines how (or if) the person pre-plans and sets priorities for achieving a goal. Prioritizing corresponds to the reasoning phase of hypothesis explanation and demonstration, which (in formal logic) is to be performed by means of deduction.


Producing:
The producing phase of a reasoning process reflects the methods by which an individual tests, verifies, expresses goals, and solves problems. Producing corresponds to the evaluation and verification phase of the reasoning process, which (in formal logic) is to be undergone by means of gradual induction.

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