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which ends are fashioned. Before an thing or idea can actually exist, it must first happen. Just as the stork does not deliver babies fully formed to the doorstep: things do not exist without a process that goes before. We as a culture tend to experience the world in terms of effects. In fact, we live in a world of effects as products. Milk comes from the store in cartons and only vaguely from cows. Television is a product world. Merchandise, ideas, even wars, emerge fully formed and ready for instant consumption. The idea that process is more important (or even as important) as the thing produced is a tough one to grasp in the context of the pervasive product-orientation of our cultural. To explain the meaning of "style" as a "manner of doing" while using language (especially the English language with its fondness for nouns and not verbs) I must, of necessity, describe attributes of style. This means that, when I attempt to speak of these process-styles, I fall into the linguistic trap of using a content-based descriptive system to define something that is not content-based at all.

"Normally we think of a fist as a thing. Could it be thought of as a process? (Make a fist and then relax it. Isn't a fist something your hand is doing?) Perhaps 'to fist' would be more accurate? Knowing that modern physics sees the world as a system of vibrations, can we think of "walling", as some Indian tribes have it, rather that "the wall"? Could "noun-ness" be an illusion based on perception which doesn't notice the activity going on?"

William Sparke and Clark McKowen
in Montage

Style as process does not lend itself to descriptive qualities such as size, shape, color, emotions, or attitudes. Styles as processes are forms which define the way in which ideas are conceived, planned for, and executed. Process style is made up of patterns of action that are defined by time, space, and energy. A process style is expressed when a thing (or an idea) moves in a particular manner through time and space while utilizing energy in a particular way.

Therefore, everything that has, does, or will exist is a child of process. Yet, it is much easier for us to analyze something that already exists than it is to develop an understanding of the style of thinking which produced it. Products and other results are visible in a way that we are used to talking about and analyzing. As a rule, those of us raised in Western society don't "see" process; it is invisible to us and thus, not part of our ordinary awareness.

There are other cultures, however, that are acutely aware of process. Traditional Japanese culture, for example, values process in such a way that learning the intricate patterns of the tea ceremony may consume a lifetime of practice with no outcome other than the process of perfecting process. The same is true of Zen gardening, samurai swordsman-ship--and the making of automobiles. When Deming introduced his Quality Management system to Japan after World War II, he brought a process system to a country that already had high reverence for process. With Deming's recipe, Japan was able to transfer centuries of understanding of the importance of process to

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