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economic achievement.
Several large corporations in the United States are attempting to implement Deming's principles of Total Quality Management. They are experiencing varying degrees of success. The difficulties they are finding are due to this difference in the understanding and awareness of process. Most important, the difficulties are due to lack of practice in the art of doing.

As Japan continues to become more "Western" and pays less attention to the process of mastering traditional sequences, she is bound to lose her capacity for integrating process into a quality product. It may take many years before the problem becomes obvious (though present signs indicate that the loss of process skills has already begun). Younger generations who are taught content in schools and the principles of management will only be able to mindlessly replicate what their fathers have created if they do not learn the "invisible" lessons of process.

This is, in essence, what has happened in the United States. In our culture, the purpose of doing has always been to "be done"--to reach the end. Therefore we, who did not have reverence for process woven into the fabric of our culture, lost the tenuous hold on process that necessity provided when television came to power. Television took away the 'empty' time of childhood in which process can develop and improve: time given to making forts, or playing "dress-ups" or any one of a number of self-structured activities of childhood. At the same time, two major household processes, laundry and meal preparation became almost process-less. Children's lives became devoid of opportunities to observe how things happen and to 'practice' processes that made things happen in their own lives. Instead, knowledge and events (devoid of the actual experiences of how they came to be) arrived via the television set. This has impacted everyone in our society because we did not have a parallel system to reinforce process as did the Japanese. Therefore, what we can conceive often exceeds what we can produce with quality and consistency. The manner (or style) in which a process "unfolds" is that potential which determines its effects upon the conduct of human behavior.

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