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2*3
THE NAMING OF QUALITIES

Most of the time, our purpose (or reason for doing something) seems to decide for us which qualities we attend to. Sometimes, however, it seems as though the qualities themselves, help to define our purpose for us.
What sort of purpose did you use for sorting out your goodies in the first exercise of this section? What sorts of qualities did your purpose guide you to select: sensory-based…attitude-based…reason (or logic) based?

Most people are unaware that they are very strongly drawn to making certain sorts of qualitative judgments:sensory, attitudinal or rational. As mentioned earlier, most people are also unaware that they tend to view one of the other categories as having some importance--a secondary level of worth. Category number three (whatever it may be for a particular individual), on the other hand, is like the opposite pole of a magnet for almost all of us. Most individuals are strongly repelled by the sorts of attributes that fall within their third category. 

These categories--sensation; attitude and rationality (or reason)--filter in the sorts of qualities (or properties) that we notice about things. Since each of us tends to pay more attention to the kinds of qualites that occur in one particular category over those that occur in another, it's only understandable that we'll have differences in the sorts of things we pay attention to--especially when we're trying to solve a problem within a particular situation (sometimes called a universe of discourse). 

Many divisive--but usually invisible--differences among different individuals within a group concern  which qualities are (or are not) perceived as important for the various members of that group. For example, someone who instinctively values qualities of reason (primary) and sensation (secondary) is likely to feel irritated at those whose primary emphasis resides upon attitude-based qualities such as those having to do with feelings andother subjective attitudes. This means that someone primarily focused upon qualities of reason and sensation may not be particularly inclined to worry about whether or not people are being nice to one another; or whether or not the work setting is beautiful; or whether the group is evolving psychologically (or in spiritual  or moral or ethical) ways.

Conversely, those who instinctively value qualities of attitude (primary) and sensation (secondary) are likely to feel irritated at those whose primary emphasis resides upon reason. They're going to feel that the reasoning types are focusing on the wrong....

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