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Q. Why does it matter what process a person uses to solve problems?
A. Again, understanding this requires a paradigm shift:
The idea that inherent patterns of mental processing affect how a person will perform (or not perform) various aspects of a particular job are foreign to most Americans. It is difficult for most of us to imagine that such an assessment predicts future performance--regardless of education or training.
The assessment looks at what a person habitually does when faced with a task that is ambiguous and does not allow him the use of language or the tools of language. We want to predict how a person will perform on a task when he does not a/ready have a procedure for performing that task

Q. Why does it matter what a person does when he has no known procedure for solving a problem? Isn't that what training is for?
A. Of course training is important, and sometimes training matters more than any other factor. However, many jobs require people to be able to solve problems that they have not encountered before, or to adjust to changing conditions that affect familiar problems in new ways. Most Americans are die-hard believers that education and training is the solution to every performance problem. We think that if we fill a person up with enough training and experience, he or she will be able to automatically perform differently in the future than now, or in the past. Most Americans believe that after someone has received appropriate training, and can "say" what he or she would do in a given situation, then that person will be able to do it. This is a mistaken assumption. "Doing" and "talking about doing" are entirely different things. As often as not, a person is able to do one and not the other.

Q. How many non-verbal thinking processes are there in your system?
A. There are five processes...but no person is viewed in terms of just one process or another. When we determine the non-verbal thinking process for a person, we look at three areas--the process method by which he or she:
(1) decides what matters (qualification),
(2) sets priorities (goal-setting)
(3) solves problems (real-time interventions)
Thus, a person's "process" is really a "process pattern" made up of the processes he uses for 1) formulating decisions of worth and value, 2) developing goals and 3) solving problems. A single individual can easily exhibit a mixture of processes in his pattern. That is, a person may decide what matters in one way, set goals in another, achieve them in still another.

Q. Is it better to have a mixture, or all of one kind of process in a pattern?
A. There is no better or worse for these patterns. The worth of a mental habit pattern depends on what you want to do with your process, or what you want an employee to be able to do. There is no higher or lower, better or worse in these processes--as there

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